Road Rash 3D

a game by Electronic Arts
Genre: Racing
Platforms: Playstation, PSX
Editor Rating: 7.5/10, based on 4 reviews, 8 reviews are shown
User Rating: 9.3/10 - 3 votes
Rate this game:
See also: Road Rash Games

Overview

Ah yes, the good old days. You know, back when games relied more on gameplay than fancy graphics. One of the best and most original games to hit the streets was Road Rash, a motorcycle racing game with a bit of a twist. The Road Rash series has been well represented across the different platforms since it first launched. The PlayStation version was basically a direct port of the 3DO version and some people were not too happy about it. Everyone wanted something new and fresh from the series but instead got the same game. Well, the time has finally come and now the PlayStation has a brand spanking new version so rashers get ready to rumble.

Road Rash 3D is looking to take the ultra-addicting gameplay of the previous version and bring the game to life with a new 3D environment. The game boasts over 100 miles of interconnected roads that are modeled after actual stretches of roadway. There are now four different distinct types of bikes, new weapons, motion captured riders and gangs that may actually cut you some slack. All of the action that made the others so much fun has been preserved so prepare for some late nights.

Gameplay

I feel that I must confess something up front: I was one of the people who did not care if the PSX version of Road Rash was a direct port or not. I just plain loved the game. Yes, it had problems and the FMV scenes were too long as well as the load times but I did not care. Once the flag dropped and the race started, I was in rash heaven. I did not care about anything else but crossing the finish line ahead of the pack. The point is that all EA had to do was not screw up the gameplay and I would like the game. Good thing they kept it intact.

If you have never checked out Road Rash in the past, let me give you the basics. This is a street motorcycle racing game. The idea is to finish the different courses in the top three and win money. You use this money to purchase new bikes that will help you win more races. What makes the game different is that the racing is full contact and if someone happens to be packing a pipe or 2X4 then so be it. You can use whatever means necessary to get ahead of the pack even if that means rapping a guy with a chain. What makes the game so great is that you don't have to brawl if you don't want to. You can concentrate purely on the racing but I can guarantee you that the first time somebody comes up next to you and takes a swipe at you with a baseball bat, you will try to retaliate. To keep things challenging, you have to outrun the cops and dodge traffic, signs and poles.

When I first heard this game was coming out, I could not wait. I was like a kid before Christmas. Like I said, I love these games so I was psyched for a new version. As we all know, the anticipation usually leads to some sort of let down. You build things up so high in your mind that there is really only one direction the actual event or product can go. I have to admit that this was the case when I first started playing. I was expecting more. The thing is, I don't really know what it was exactly that I was expecting but I just knew I was looking for more. This is the reason we play games longer than just getting an impression because the more I played this game, the more I found myself getting pulled in and addicted like games past. To be quite blunt about it, this game is a hell of a lot of fun and it is definitely worthy of the Road Rash name.

Since this is a different game, there have been some changes made other than just cosmetically. The first change, and the biggest, is that there are now four different types of bikes on the road. In past games, all of the bikes were the same type and looked the same. Now, you can choose from Race Replicas, Sport, Rat or Cruiser bikes. Each of these bikes has a very different look, style and characteristics. For example, the Sports bikes look like Ninja street bikes and they are pretty fast and corner excellently. The Cruisers are Harley looking bikes that have a ton of power but don't corner that well. Having these different bikes changes the game immensely. What I did to keep the game fun was to start out and finish with the same class bike. That means that if I started level one with a Cruiser, I would always purchase another Cruiser when I upgraded my bike. It was really cool because I got the feeling of all the different bikes available and had to learn how to ride them all. Believe me, you can't ride the bikes the same way, you will never make it out of the first turn.

A big part of the game is buying new bikes to help you advance through the game. This was one thing that I was a little disappointed in. Since there are only three different levels, you only have three levels of bikes to purchase. Sure, with four classes the total of bikes is 12 but I really wanted more. I remember trying to save all of my money in the previous version so I could buy the fastest bike and kick the crap out of the rest of the racers. You may win enough money to be able to purchase a level three bike near the end of level two but you will only have a few more races until you qualify for level three. Once you qualify for level three, you are racing against other level three bikes so you are just one in a pack of the same.

Speaking of the different levels, the game is broken up into three different levels. The first level is made up of eight different courses. You have to finish in the top three positions on all of the courses and then you will advance to level two. Each pits you against other racers of the same level. For example, on level two, all of the other rashers have level two bikes. Like I mentioned above, you can save your cash and purchase a level two bike even if you are still on level one. It is pretty tough to make enough money to afford a bike for the next level but if you can pull it off, you will rip through the rest of the level. My only complaint about the levels is that I wish they would have made them a bit shorter. I would have rather had four or five shorter levels than three long levels. That would have meant that you had more bikes to shoot for.

Another big change between this game and the previous versions is that you are broken up into gangs. This was a great idea because instead of the game being every man for himself, it gave you a bit of loyalty to the some of the other bikers. The type of bike you ride determines your gang. For example, if you ride a Cruiser, you are automatically part of the Dewley gang. These are the ponytail-clad bikers that are big into clubs and chains. So if you race a Cruiser, you are part of the gang which means that you will handle clubs and chains a bit better and the rest of the Cruisers will cut you some slack. This added a new dimension to the game. Instead of just pounding the crap out of everybody in sight, I found myself not hitting the other racers in my gang and they would extend the same courtesy to me. Even though this was the case most of the time, there were times that it did not matter if you were in the same gang or not because you were going to get the crap kicked out of you regardless. It was funny because I found myself feeling bad when I had to unleash an ass kicking on one of my own gang members but I did whatever it took to win.

I did have a few complaints with the game. The first complaint is in the controls. Well, actually the analog control was smooth but the standard digital control was very tough to use. Everything in this game is based on drifting, floating and cutting on the corners and the digital pad was just to stiff to achieve this. The only problem is that with the analog controller, the configuration is just plain annoying. What I mean by this is that the left stick is used for steering and the right stick is used for gas and break. If you push down the left stick, it changes the camera view to look behind your bike. If you push down the right stick, it activates one of your nitro bursts. The problem is, when you are racing and you hit a corner at 150 MPH, you slam the stick in the direction of the corner and you jam the right stick down for the brakes. I can't count how many times I accidentally pushed down on one of the sticks causing me to either use a nitro unintentionally or have my view switched to behind me which really screwed up my cornering. Sure, these may be my own fault but I am sure others will do the same. My second complaint is not really a complaint but a warning. This game gets really tough when you hit level three. I cruised through the first two levels in a few hours. When I got to level three, it took me days before I even qualified on one track.

Graphics

This is where the 3D comes into play. They did a great job on the riders and the bikes. They all look realistic. When I ran into a car head-on and I was thrown from my bike, the dude looked so cool with his arms in a slight swimming motion and the bike tumbling along behind me. The backgrounds were adequate but there were times that I would drive off the road and the graphics would tweak for a minute. The different courses were all well thought out and I was impressed with the developers because they always seemed to know where to stick a car, light pole or sign to keep you from ripping through the courses. I think the details could have been a bit sharper (not including the bikes and riders) but they got the job done.Bottom Line
If you are a former rasher, you should really have a blast. Sure, the gameplay is nothing new but look at it as a positive because a lot of times when the gameplay is messed with, the whole game ends up sucking. The great looking bikes and riders make you feel like you are a part of the action and the addition of different types of bikes really pulled me into the game more. I am not sure what sort of reaction the rest of the gaming press will have on this game but since I am a long time rasher, I really enjoyed it.

Download Road Rash 3D

Playstation Download

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

PSX Download

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

Game Reviews

People say:

7.5

Ever since the 3DO version of Road Rash game out (the game that pushed me into buying that awful system), I've been waiting for a worthy sequel to arrive. Fortunately, RR3D is that sequel, though to be totally fair, if you're not a die-hard Road Rash fan like myself, you may find yourself wondering what all the fuss is about. Road Rash 3D doesn't offer any major improvements over its predecessors other than the obvious, which is a fully 3D engine, new music (I actually prefer the old music) and much better track designs. Oh, and there's analog control and Dual Shock support (and in similar fashion, l prefers the digital pad). The gameplay is well-balanced, and the four different classes of bikes are varied enough that you can realty feel the difference in control between them, but the combat portion of the game--which is really like half the fun of it all--has been toned down a lot. The graphics and sounds are very nice (some of the later tracks look gorgeous), and when you get some of the later (faster) bikes, the screen just screams by, making for some intense racing. Yet still, I can't help but feel like RR3D could've been much more. And as minor a complaint as it may be, I really hate the fact that you no longer control your guy running back to the bike after a crash. Still, RR fans should be satisfied.

8.5

I was skeptical of the 3D polygon incarnation of RR. Would it top or at least equal the quality of the 3DO version? In a word: yes. To its advantage, it takes a lot more skill and finesse to maneuver the bikes. Also, several styles of motorcycle are available rather than just sport bikes. The tracks are very long as well making winning a reality even with a few wrecks--no time consuming jog back to the bike either. Overall, a good sequel.

7.5

As an avid Road Rash fan, I was really glad to see this game finally get finished. I'm also glad that EA came through with a very good racing game. Unfortunately, the combat in this RR is a little tamer than the others--it seems like the fighting is more sparse. For some odd reason RR's polygonal graphics made it hard to sustain huge, drawn-out brawls on bikes. Nevertheless, RR 3D is fun and has attitude--give it a try.

7.5

Road Rash 3D packs nearly everything I loved about the classic series--high speed, cool courses, nasty spills and intense combat (although fighting's not as crucial as before). The graphics, while not up to GT's standards, are adequately fast. Some of the series' in-your-face personality is missing. Cinemas are particularly weak, and you're now placed on the bike automatically after a crash (I prefer the old run-to-your-bike routine).

The feeling of asphalt scraping the skin off your knees is about to return, except this time it's in true 3-D. Yep, the Road Rash series finally takes the plunge into the 3-D pool in Road Rash 3D for the PlayStation.

Besides the obvious graphical changes, the game offers a system of interconnecting roads for you to race along. Upon completing one section, a new stretch of road is loaded in front of you so you can effectively continue along the same highway (the game apparently gives 50 miles of road).

Of course, on your way there the game lets you have run-ins with rival gang members (and their interesting outfits) at high speeds. The punches, kicks, whips, chains and overall mayhem of previous Road Rash games is retained, to keep things interesting.

As you watch your enemies flip over their bikes, and land on their skulls, you'll enjoy their fluid animation thanks to Electronic Arts' motion-capture technology. Tumbles, slides and other bodily movements look completely realistic, proving again why there's no need to try this stuff at home.

Unlike its predecessors. Road Rash 3D features a realistic physics engine. When your bike slides during a sharp turn, it behaves according to the properties of that particular curve. And you'll be able to try out those physics with a good number of bikes in four different classes.

  • MANUFACTURER - Electronic Arts
  • THEME - Racing
  • NUMBER OF PLAYERS - 1

Overview

Ah yes, the good old days. You know, back when games relied more on gameplay than fancy graphics. One of the best and most original games to hit the streets was Road Rash, a motorcycle racing game with a bit of a twist. The Road Rash series has been well represented across the different platforms since it first launched. The PlayStation version was basically a direct port of the 3DO version and some people were not too happy about it. Everyone wanted something new and fresh from the series but instead got the same game. Well, the time has finally come and now the PlayStation has a brand spanking new version so rashers get ready to rumble.

Road Rash 3D is looking to take the ultra-addicting gameplay of the previous version and bring the game to life with a new 3D environment. The game boasts over 100 miles of interconnected roads that are modeled after actual stretches of roadway. There are now four different distinct types of bikes, new weapons, motion captured riders and gangs that may actually cut you some slack. All of the action that made the others so much fun has been preserved so prepare for some late nights.

Gameplay

I feel that I must confess something up front: I was one of the people who did not care if the PSX version of Road Rash was a direct port or not. I just plain loved the game. Yes, it had problems and the FMV scenes were too long as well as the load times but I did not care. Once the flag dropped and the race started, I was in rash heaven. I did not care about anything else but crossing the finish line ahead of the pack. The point is that all EA had to do was not screw up the gameplay and I would like the game. Good thing they kept it intact.

If you have never checked out Road Rash in the past, let me give you the basics. This is a street motorcycle racing game. The idea is to finish the different courses in the top three and win money. You use this money to purchase new bikes that will help you win more races. What makes the game different is that the racing is full contact and if someone happens to be packing a pipe or 2X4 then so be it. You can use whatever means necessary to get ahead of the pack even if that means rapping a guy with a chain. What makes the game so great is that you don't have to brawl if you don't want to. You can concentrate purely on the racing but I can guarantee you that the first time somebody comes up next to you and takes a swipe at you with a baseball bat, you will try to retaliate. To keep things challenging, you have to outrun the cops and dodge traffic, signs and poles.

When I first heard this game was coming out, I could not wait. I was like a kid before Christmas. Like I said, I love these games so I was psyched for a new version. As we all know, the anticipation usually leads to some sort of let down. You build things up so high in your mind that there is really only one direction the actual event or product can go. I have to admit that this was the case when I first started playing. I was expecting more. The thing is, I don't really know what it was exactly that I was expecting but I just knew I was looking for more. This is the reason we play games longer than just getting an impression because the more I played this game, the more I found myself getting pulled in and addicted like games past. To be quite blunt about it, this game is a hell of a lot of fun and it is definitely worthy of the Road Rash name.

Since this is a different game, there have been some changes made other than just cosmetically. The first change, and the biggest, is that there are now four different types of bikes on the road. In past games, all of the bikes were the same type and looked the same. Now, you can choose from Race Replicas, Sport, Rat or Cruiser bikes. Each of these bikes has a very different look, style and characteristics. For example, the Sports bikes look like Ninja street bikes and they are pretty fast and corner excellently. The Cruisers are Harley looking bikes that have a ton of power but don't corner that well. Having these different bikes changes the game immensely. What I did to keep the game fun was to start out and finish with the same class bike. That means that if I started level one with a Cruiser, I would always purchase another Cruiser when I upgraded my bike. It was really cool because I got the feeling of all the different bikes available and had to learn how to ride them all. Believe me, you can't ride the bikes the same way, you will never make it out of the first turn.

A big part of the game is buying new bikes to help you advance through the game. This was one thing that I was a little disappointed in. Since there are only three different levels, you only have three levels of bikes to purchase. Sure, with four classes the total of bikes is 12 but I really wanted more. I remember trying to save all of my money in the previous version so I could buy the fastest bike and kick the crap out of the rest of the racers. You may win enough money to be able to purchase a level three bike near the end of level two but you will only have a few more races until you qualify for level three. Once you qualify for level three, you are racing against other level three bikes so you are just one in a pack of the same.

Speaking of the different levels, the game is broken up into three different levels. The first level is made up of eight different courses. You have to finish in the top three positions on all of the courses and then you will advance to level two. Each pits you against other racers of the same level. For example, on level two, all of the other rashers have level two bikes. Like I mentioned above, you can save your cash and purchase a level two bike even if you are still on level one. It is pretty tough to make enough money to afford a bike for the next level but if you can pull it off, you will rip through the rest of the level. My only complaint about the levels is that I wish they would have made them a bit shorter. I would have rather had four or five shorter levels than three long levels. That would have meant that you had more bikes to shoot for.

Another big change between this game and the previous versions is that you are broken up into gangs. This was a great idea because instead of the game being every man for himself, it gave you a bit of loyalty to the some of the other bikers. The type of bike you ride determines your gang. For example, if you ride a Cruiser, you are automatically part of the Dewley gang. These are the ponytail-clad bikers that are big into clubs and chains. So if you race a Cruiser, you are part of the gang which means that you will handle clubs and chains a bit better and the rest of the Cruisers will cut you some slack. This added a new dimension to the game. Instead of just pounding the crap out of everybody in sight, I found myself not hitting the other racers in my gang and they would extend the same courtesy to me. Even though this was the case most of the time, there were times that it did not matter if you were in the same gang or not because you were going to get the crap kicked out of you regardless. It was funny because I found myself feeling bad when I had to unleash an ass kicking on one of my own gang members but I did whatever it took to win.

I did have a few complaints with the game. The first complaint is in the controls. Well, actually the analog control was smooth but the standard digital control was very tough to use. Everything in this game is based on drifting, floating and cutting on the corners and the digital pad was just to stiff to achieve this. The only problem is that with the analog controller, the configuration is just plain annoying. What I mean by this is that the left stick is used for steering and the right stick is used for gas and break. If you push down the left stick, it changes the camera view to look behind your bike. If you push down the right stick, it activates one of your nitro bursts. The problem is, when you are racing and you hit a corner at 150 MPH, you slam the stick in the direction of the corner and you jam the right stick down for the brakes. I can't count how many times I accidentally pushed down on one of the sticks causing me to either use a nitro unintentionally or have my view switched to behind me which really screwed up my cornering. Sure, these may be my own fault but I am sure others will do the same. My second complaint is not really a complaint but a warning. This game gets really tough when you hit level three. I cruised through the first two levels in a few hours. When I got to level three, it took me days before I even qualified on one track.

Graphics

This is where the 3D comes into play. They did a great job on the riders and the bikes. They all look realistic. When I ran into a car head-on and I was thrown from my bike, the dude looked so cool with his arms in a slight swimming motion and the bike tumbling along behind me. The backgrounds were adequate but there were times that I would drive off the road and the graphics would tweak for a minute. The different courses were all well thought out and I was impressed with the developers because they always seemed to know where to stick a car, light pole or sign to keep you from ripping through the courses. I think the details could have been a bit sharper (not including the bikes and riders) but they got the job done.

Bottom Line

If you are a former rasher, you should really have a blast. Sure, the gameplay is nothing new but look at it as a positive because a lot of times when the gameplay is messed with, the whole game ends up sucking. The great looking bikes and riders make you feel like you are a part of the action and the addition of different types of bikes really pulled me into the game more. I am not sure what sort of reaction the rest of the gaming press will have on this game but since I am a long time rasher, I really enjoyed it.

Road Rash debuts in 3D with the same slick execution, humorous flair, and intense gameplay that drove the series to stardom back in the Genesis days. If you've been longing for the return of the Rash, Road Rash 3D is the answer to your prayers.

Before starting to burn rubber, you sign on with one of four gangs, each with their own attitude and bike, like the hog-style cruisers or the zippy, flashy racers. Then the thrashing begins in 32 interconnected tracks filled with vertigo-inducing descents, wild jumps, and raucous combat where you battle the pack with kicks, clubs, chains, cattle prods, and much more.

The familiar gameplay requires a more intelligent racing style, though there's definitely plenty of skull-busting mayhem to balance it out. All told, RR3D is not without its flaws (including occasional slowdown, no two-player mode, and a disturbing tendency to ricochet around the track), but its riveting action delivers enough high-octane excitement to make the game well worth its entry fee.

ProTips:

  • The secret to high-speed cornering is to lay off the gas, stay away from the brake, and use the Lean and Super Steer buttons to dive through the turn.
  • Stick to the yellow line when going around blind turns and up rises--it's the best place from which to react to potential
  • Always save one nitro boost for the sprint to the finish line.
  • If you wander off-road, you can simply bust through the guardrails and other barriers to get back on pavement without wrecking.
  • Brake only in neardeath situations, like oncoming collisions or bad skids. This almost always saves the day.

Graphics

The sharp 3D tracks are finely tuned for racing, delivering a good sensation of speed and, amazingly, almost no pop-up at all. Scenic landscapes and well-animated racers catch the eye, but bad pixelation crops up if you stray too far from the road.

Control

This Rash demands much smarter racing, so you'll have to spend some time mastering the handling of these bikes. Once conquered, you have impressive control, and each bike has its own unique feel. Still, it's too easy to get caught in a pinball-like series of collisions.

Sound

The edgy alternative soundtrack, featuring bands like Sugar Ray and CIV, perfectly accompanies the meaty thwack of your club bouncing off some fool's skull. Other humorous yelps from racers, along with the purring engines, add up to an excellent audio experience.

Fun Factor

Road Rash 3D sticks to the tried-and-true formula of this popular series, and that means plenty of great tracks, white-knuckle racing, and outrageous combat. Longtime fans and newbies alike will find more than enough adrenaline-filled action to warrant a purchase.

The Road Rash series has enjoyed runaway success on every platform it's appeared on. seducing gamers with its taut motorcycle racing and club-thumping combat. As the series nears its second start on the PlayStation with Road Rash 3D. EA's planned some impressive refinements that should take RR3D to the next level without diminishing the core gameplay ot this proven hit.

The Rash Is Back

Tentatively scheduled for a March release. RR3D's most striking improvement is the creation of a 3D world populated with biker gangs and interconnected tracks. "The whole idea is to make Road Rash more immersive for the player," says Hunter Smith, the game's producer. 'The player will enter the Road Rash world, meet people, hang out with them, race them."

Adding in gangs is a key part of accomplishing that. The player will race against--and fight--the members of four gangs, each with their own distinctive bike, racing style, and combative attitude (see sidebar "Biker Gangs").

The 200-plus miles of tracks are all located in one 3D world, where each gang is headquartered in a region that best suits their racing style. In previous Rashes, the courses were just long strips, and as you progressed to the next level, a few more miles were added on at the end, so you saw the same scenery over and over again. In RR3D, each course (32 total) will take you over a different sequence of the world's interconnected roads. Players will come to recognize locations, but this approach will add a great deal of variety to the action.. .especially with 200 miles to work with.

That's My Club!

Fortunately, that classic Road Rash gameplay will remain the heart of the game. On the racing side, Smith reports that the physics model is much more sophisticated. which means more realistic racing and more braking. "You'll be able to see tires slide out in the back, really feel the guy lean through the turn, and feel what banking does to a bike," he explains.

New weapons will juice up the combat, though Smith wasn't able to unveil the details yet. "We're not trying to change it in terms of bringing in weapons like projectiles or guns," Smith says. "In Road Rash, the whole idea has always been fighting in close proximity to your adversary, so that if you're in combat. you're vulnerable."

On the features side, the game will be single-player only, and Rashers will hit the streets in Time Trial mode. Thrash mode (single races), or Big Game mode (a season-like series). Winning earns you the cash to purchase one of 20 bikes with manual or automatic transmissions. Once in the race, you'll be able to look back and to the sides on the tly as you pull wheelies, put cops in their place, and evade obstacles. Other cool features may include owning multiple bikes, stealing bikes from riders you knock down, cops that chase you in other vehicles besides bikes, and analog-controller support--but only if the development team has time to implement them.

Eye-Catching Rash

Smith is careful to point out that everything you see on these pages is unfinished and unpolished, but RR3D's graphics already shine. Beyond the jump to 3D. the visuals sport much more detailed terrain and much better character animations than previous Rash titles.

But the most impressive development is RR3D's perspective. At a basic level, it remains the traditional behind-the-biker view, but RR3D streams data off the CD to create a pre-rendered cylinder of graphics that moves with the player. For gamers, this means that RR3D not only eliminates the pop-up problems that plague many PlayStation racers, but it also gives them an unprecedented look down the upcoming road.

"You can see what looks like several kilometers into the distance, which really eliminates things from just popping up, like mountains," Smith explains, "but it also has another cool effect. For example, if you're up in a high elevation, you can look out and see a city below and the road stretching into it. Then, as you race, you head down the road and into the city. It gives you a sense that you're really going somewhere."

Ready to Rock

Smith and his team are off to a fine start with RR3D. balancing innovation with classic RR gameplay. They're even working to sign some big-name bands to the soundtrack (the first Road Rash rocked to the rhythms of Soundgarden), but nothing was set at press time. But if all the pieces of RR3D come together in the next tew months. EA has a winner headed for the finish line.

Techgeists

Racing pros. Less into violence, more into tight control and racing. Based in a canyon region because they love tough turns. Will fight, but not as much as others.

Duelies

Sit back and ride big Harley-style cruisers. Have huge acceleration, but don't handle turns well, so prefer rolling hills. Don't necessarily start fights, but finish them.

DeSades

Based in the city. Ride tough "rat" bikes that take tons of abuse. Race kamikaze style; just blow through obstacles. Pesky riders--will fight anytime.

Cafe Boys

Into fast, flashy racing bikes; love both the speed and looking good. The bike's an accessory.

After too much time in the shop, Road Rash is ready to ride again on the PlayStation with a stylish 3D look and that same skull-busting action Rashers expect.

Back in the Saddle

Many gamers will be stoked just to play a new Road Rash, but RR3D's heading for the starting line with some slick refinements. The racing, while still squarely on the arcade side, is revved up with bikes that have much more realistic responses, especially for braking and cornering. Cruisers really drag and slide sideways in turns, while the sleek sport bikes dive right through.

But RR3D's not just a racing game, and that means plenty of club-thumping combat to keep the action exciting. Your arsenal this time is planned to include cans of mace, chains, nunchucks, clubs, pipes, stun guns, 2x4s, and crowbars... and the pack definitely puts up a fight. This preview version glittered with potential--if EA pulls everything together as planned, RR3D should head straight to the top of the charts.

Popping Wheelies

Road Rash 3D's spanking-new 3D graphics perform well, nicely modernizing the look of this classic series. Animated with tons of cool new movements, the polygonal riders look more lifelike than ever before: They glance over their shoulder as the pack closes in, hunch tight over the handlebars at high speed, and yank the bike up for a wheelie. The interconnected 3D courses look sharp, too, and make for an engaging racing environment.

Enough elements in this unfinished version were still under construction, though, that it wasn't possible to judge the game's speed or draw-in, but the early indications were promising. And EA was deep in negotiations with a major recording label to sign some top-name talent to the soundtrack--always a key part of the Road Rash experience!

EA hasn't released much new into on Road Rash 3D since our feature in the January issue (see "Spotlight on Road Rash 3D"), but this fresh batch of game screens shows that the visuals have progressed superbly since then. The game's slick 3D engine already looks cool, showcasing excellent detail in both the bikers and the terrain.

As for features, gamers will join up with one of four rival gangs, each with their own personality, then rocket through over 200 miles of interconnected tracks. Rashers will of course bust chops with clubs, chains, and some new weapons, and upgrade their ride from a selection of 20 bikes as they battle cops and the pack in a dash to the finish. As soon as we score some hands-on time with this scorching-hot prospect, we'll update you on how this latest Rash rides. Air Hendrix

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