Kings Field 2

a game by ASCII , and Agetec
Genre: Adventure/RPG
Platforms: Playstation, PSX
Editor Rating: 7/10, based on 3 reviews, 5 reviews are shown
User Rating: 8.0/10 - 1 vote
Rate this game:

King's Field 2 is a first-person adventure/RPG due out for the PlayStation from Atlus. This is one of the best games of this type. The world is realistic, right down to the swells in the water.

Unlike many games of this type, you aren't bound to one plane or stuck indoors. For example, you can go outside and climb the stairs of a narrow spire. It'll give you a good vantage point to see all around.

To help you out. you can look up or down. This is particularly useful when fighting things like slimes who are low to the ground. The whole game scrolls smoothly, having a surreal effect. This is one of those games that is just perfect for those rainy days. Turn the lights off and get totally absorbed. Doom fanatics might be disappointed that the action isn't super-intense. However, you'll jump when a skeleton leap out at you with a cleaver.

  • MANUFACTURER - Ascii
  • THEME - RPG
  • NUMBER OF PLAYERS - 1

Download Kings Field 2

Playstation Download

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

PSX Download

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

Game Reviews

Overview

The King's Field saga is back and better than before. King's Field II is an action/adventure/RPG played from the first person perspective and follows the same type of interface as the original title but, believe me, some of the problems have been corrected.

Without rewriting the novel that comprises the story of KF II, let me fill you in on the story line. In the first KF game, your quest was to find the missing Moonlight Sword and vanquish all of the monsters and various terrible creatures to regain peace and safety in your once happy little village. In KF II, you play as the son of the great warrior in the first game. After the adventure in the original KF, peace had descended across the land for nearly five years before the next outbreak in terror. A storm blew in over the peaceful village and lightning struck the castle of the king. The storm continued for days, leaving the town in a virtual blanket of darkness. Through the storm, the king fell gravely ill. He remained ill for nearly a month and, upon regaining his health, he was no longer feared by the demons of the land. Soon the village was attacked by the various evil creatures of the land and the king made no attempt at stopping them. Something had happened to the king during his illness that caused him to become evil. Now, it is up to you as his son to face your destiny and save your father.

Gameplay

King's Field II is very similar in play mechanics to the original title. If you missed the first KF, Ascii Entertainment has developed a unique perspective to play an adventure/RPG game. You play the game from the first person perspective, ala Doom, except the focus is on problem-solving and swordplay instead of grenades and shotguns. The battles mostly consist of slash and dash fighting, which gets a bit tedious after a while. This was one thing I had hoped would be spiced up some in the second title but, unfortunately, was not.

The basic object of KF II is to find your father and confront the evil that has enveloped his body. Your journey to this climax is an amazingly huge and time-consuming process. This game has so much area to cover and so many different worlds to explore. It took me nearly 2 days of playing to advance from the first main area. I spent most of the time exploring every nook and cranny and beating up on the wimpy plant enemies to collect gold.

A big part of the game is interfacing with other humans you will meet along your journey. You will encounter store clerks, friends of your family, appraisers and innkeepers. All of these individuals are here to help, if you know how to use them correctly. Each person always has something to say and most of the time it is invaluable. Always listen closely but if you happen to forget something, the game has a cool feature which allows you to go back and view any previous conversation. That way, if you can't remember if the person told you to head West or East, you go review the conversation.

Throughout the game, you will encounter a number of monsters that must be defeated. When defeated, they will normally drop treasure or other valuable goods. Some creatures even carry items essential to progressing in the game so running is not an option. You must stand and fight. Like I mentioned above, the fighting is the slash and dash type. What this means is you run up to an enemy and slash it with your sword then dash back away from it until your power recharges. This type of fighting gets old quick. You are able to purchase different types of swords and hand-held weapons but this type of fighting is still a bit boring. I will give credit to the designers: The fighting is a bit more entertaining in KF II because some of the enemies are easier to kill which allows you to survive longer than in the first game.

The game interfacing is quite simple with one-button menu screens. Everything is very accessible during gameplay and is quite easy to use. Switching weapons and armor is a breeze, as is using magic or other items. Not only are the menus easier to use, they are quick to load and execute. This keeps the game moving along at a decent pace. One of my biggest pet peeves is a game that takes forever to load menu screens in the middle of the gameplay. I want in and out as quick as possible.

Graphics

KF II cleaned up some of the rough edges graphically in the game. Everything is 3D polygon and looks good. The idea behind the game was to immerse the player in the world and make you feel like you are not controlling someone else but living the game yourself. I don't know if any game is good enough to do that but as KF II comes as close as you could realistically expect. The enemies are all well done and look good. I found myself jumping back as the Skeletons came popping out of the treasure chest. On the whole, the graphics are very good.

Bottom Line

KF II is a very entertaining game that will keep you playing hour after hour. The worlds are huge and there is always a new challenge waiting around every corner. The somewhat archaic combat system still does not do it for me but it is better in this one than in the first King's Field. In KF III I would love to see some long range weapons like a bow and arrows or spears. This would add tremendously to the combat aspect of the game. But, with that already said, I think that the focus of the game is more on the adventure side than the combat side. If Ascii could just find a happy medium for KF III, they will definitely have a winner on their hands.

Overview

The King's Field saga is back and better than before. King's Field II is an action/adventure/RPG played from the first person perspective and follows the same type of interface as the original title but, believe me, some of the problems have been corrected.

Without rewriting the novel that comprises the story of KF II, let me fill you in on the story line. In the first KF game, your quest was to find the missing Moonlight Sword and vanquish all of the monsters and various terrible creatures to regain peace and safety in your once happy little village. In KF II, you play as the son of the great warrior in the first game. After the adventure in the original KF, peace had descended across the land for nearly five years before the next outbreak in terror. A storm blew in over the peaceful village and lightning struck the castle of the king. The storm continued for days, leaving the town in a virtual blanket of darkness. Through the storm, the king fell gravely ill. He remained ill for nearly a month and, upon regaining his health, he was no longer feared by the demons of the land. Soon the village was attacked by the various evil creatures of the land and the king made no attempt at stopping them. Something had happened to the king during his illness that caused him to become evil. Now, it is up to you as his son to face your destiny and save your father.

Gameplay

King's Field II is very similar in play mechanics to the original title. If you missed the first KF, Ascii Entertainment has developed a unique perspective to play an adventure/RPG game. You play the game from the first person perspective, ala Doom, except the focus is on problem-solving and swordplay instead of grenades and shotguns. The battles mostly consist of slash and dash fighting, which gets a bit tedious after a while. This was one thing I had hoped would be spiced up some in the second title but, unfortunately, was not.

The basic object of KF II is to find your father and confront the evil that has enveloped his body. Your journey to this climax is an amazingly huge and time-consuming process. This game has so much area to cover and so many different worlds to explore. It took me nearly 2 days of playing to advance from the first main area. I spent most of the time exploring every nook and cranny and beating up on the wimpy plant enemies to collect gold.

A big part of the game is interfacing with other humans you will meet along your journey. You will encounter store clerks, friends of your family, appraisers and innkeepers. All of these individuals are here to help, if you know how to use them correctly. Each person always has something to say and most of the time it is invaluable. Always listen closely but if you happen to forget something, the game has a cool feature which allows you to go back and view any previous conversation. That way, if you can't remember if the person told you to head West or East, you go review the conversation.

Throughout the game, you will encounter a number of monsters that must be defeated. When defeated, they will normally drop treasure or other valuable goods. Some creatures even carry items essential to progressing in the game so running is not an option. You must stand and fight. Like I mentioned above, the fighting is the slash and dash type. What this means is you run up to an enemy and slash it with your sword then dash back away from it until your power recharges. This type of fighting gets old quick. You are able to purchase different types of swords and hand-held weapons but this type of fighting is still a bit boring. I will give credit to the designers: The fighting is a bit more entertaining in KF II because some of the enemies are easier to kill which allows you to survive longer than in the first game.

The game interfacing is quite simple with one-button menu screens. Everything is very accessible during gameplay and is quite easy to use. Switching weapons and armor is a breeze, as is using magic or other items. Not only are the menus easier to use, they are quick to load and execute. This keeps the game moving along at a decent pace. One of my biggest pet peeves is a game that takes forever to load menu screens in the middle of the gameplay. I want in and out as quick as possible.

Graphics

KF II cleaned up some of the rough edges graphically in the game. Everything is 3D polygon and looks good. The idea behind the game was to immerse the player in the world and make you feel like you are not controlling someone else but living the game yourself. I don't know if any game is good enough to do that but as KF II comes as close as you could realistically expect. The enemies are all well done and look good. I found myself jumping back as the Skeletons came popping out of the treasure chest. On the whole, the graphics are very good.

Bottom Line

KF II is a very entertaining game that will keep you playing hour after hour. The worlds are huge and there is always a new challenge waiting around every corner. The somewhat archaic combat system still does not do it for me but it is better in this one than in the first King's Field. In KF III I would love to see some long range weapons like a bow and arrows or spears. This would add tremendously to the combat aspect of the game. But, with that already said, I think that the focus of the game is more on the adventure side than the combat side. If Ascii could just find a happy medium for KF III, they will definitely have a winner on their hands.

King's Field II is a hapless first-person RPG that's neither as smooth nor as fun as Death Keep for the 3DO. Slow movements, unfair matchups against enemies, and dull gameplay make it tough to cultivate loyalty to King's Field.

King's Ransom

The problems revolve around the FunFactor. Chasing monsters is one thing, but chasing them in slow motion while they speed up to kill you is a different matter.

Controlling your adventurer is tough. Sluggish screen movement is exacerbated by a slow-to-charge weapon bar. Enemies glide along and kill you while you're unprepared, which adds to the frustration.

Field of Seams

Graphically, the game's dungeons and monsters look similar throughout every level. There's also plenty of breakup with lots of seams appearing where they shouldn't.

As for sounds, there are eerie effects a la Doom, but for the most part, you'll hear scarier sounds in Michael Jackson's bedroom. Not even the enemies can muster the energy to sonically scare you.

King's Field is definitely a rental. With flaccid gameplay and less-than-fearsome monsters, this adventure takes the long and winding road to the discount barrel.

ProTips:

  • Look in all the barrels, especially the first one In the caves. You'll find an iron mask.
  • Attack monsters from the side.

ASCII Entertainment has released a sequel to last year's King's Field, a game that had a lot of problems (see the ProReview, April). KFII, unfortunately, has many of the same flaws. Minor cosmetic changes, such as larger maps, complex enemies, and expanded cut scenes, were made, but slow movement, unfair matchups, and dull gameplay continue to reign supreme in this ordinary RPG.

Bored of the Kings

Like last year's King's Field (which was called King's Field 2 in Japan), KFII has sluggish gameplay. As you walk around in a first-person perspective, you come upon plenty of rampaging monsters, but unfortunately everything onscreen looks like it's moving underwater. A melee round against a low-level creature can take up to five minutes to complete. Multiply that five minutes by the large number of encounters in the first level alone, and you'll quickly realize how interesting homework can be in comparison.

Once you're in a fight, your character's defense is frustrat-ingly inept, making many small enemies way too powerful.

For instance, a skeleton with a berzerker-like attack can defeat you with only one blow, while you need four hits to bring him down. Adding to the frustration is the hit meter, which takes too long to recharge.

Royal Ratings

Graphically, King Field's II is slightly better than its predecessor. The occasional screen breakup of the first game seems to have been fixed, and the magical special effects generate genuine "oohs" and "aahs." However, some shading, especially in the corridors of dungeons or castles, would have greatly complemented the rendered 3D graphics.

Sound has also been improved. Bone-chilling screams and original sound effects create a colorful sonic atmosphere. The intro, however, plays both music and dialogue, and the music basically drowns out the voices.

At best, King's Field II is a decent rental, because its slow gameplay gets more and more frustrating the longer you stay with it. At worst... well, hopefully the King has been deposed and won't be returning to this field.

ProTips:

  • To defeat monsters without being hit, attack them from the side.
  • When you first enter the game, go across the bridge and to the other side of the wall. Get the armored boots from the chest to the right But watch out for the trap....
  • Open chests and quickly retreat to avoid traps and other nasty surprises.
  • Search around carcasses and abandoned equipment for extra goodies.
  • Stand a safe distance away from your enemy when using particular spells so you're not caught in the blast area.
  • Make sure to look In barrels and other receptacles for special Items.
  • Discrepancies on the ground or on walls may be secret rooms and special Items.