The Adventures of Cookie and Cream

a game by Agetec, and FromSoftware
Genre: Adventure/RPG
Platforms: Playstation 2, DS
Editor Rating: 8/10, based on 1 review, 2 reviews are shown
User Rating: 8.0/10 - 1 vote
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The Adventures of Cookie and Cream
The Adventures of Cookie and Cream
The Adventures of Cookie and Cream
The Adventures of Cookie and Cream

The DS version of the hopping dynamic duo's adventures has been watered down for a more single-user-friendly experience. Translation: less brain strain here. The splitscreen is now horizontal, thus removing the PS2 version's notorious simultaneous play mechanic. Instead, you trigger Cream only during key moments of a stage--which prompts lare-style minigames.

BOTTOM LINE: Some puzzles demand simultaneous use of the touch screen and shoulder buttons, but it's not as complex as the PS2 game's split-screen stuff. Wireless co-op and battle modes are fun for a bit.

Download The Adventures of Cookie and Cream

Playstation 2

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

DS

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

Game Reviews

Overview

Two adventurous rabbits attempt to find the missing moon, so they can once again have their annual Moon Festival. How their crowns -- one shaped like a flowerpot and one like an umbrella -- fit into this story is anybody's guess, but what isn't hard to understand is the appeal of playing the best cooperative two-player game ever made.

Gameplay, Controls, Interface

Defining The Adventures of Cookie & Cream (C&C) is difficult, as it covers a pretty broad spectrum of genres including platform, puzzle, action and party game. In fact it is one of a very small group of games to offer two-player cooperative play, and one of an even smaller group that does it well. But really, you have to define C&C as being three different types of games.

First, you can play C&C as a very difficult single-player game. The reason it is so difficult is that you must control both characters at the same time, using one analog stick and two shoulder buttons for each character. Needless to say, as the game difficulty increases, the gameplay becomes pretty intense as the time starts counting down and you have to switch back and forth repeatedly between the two characters to get past certain obstacles. If you've been looking for an extremely challenging but unique single-player platform/puzzle game, you've found it.

Second, C&C can be played as a two-player cooperative game, with each player helping the other past obstacles to the end of the level. Usually a barrier down the middle of the screen splits the players, with certain actions by each character affecting the opposite character. You may have to operate a bridge, break down a wall, rope up a crocodile, etc. The most fun occurs when you both ride on the same vehicle and must coordinate actions, like both rowing in the same direction, to move forward. The boss encounters seemed overly simple, but were enjoyable as well. If you have two gamers in the house who want to work together, not against each other, C&C will make them extremely happy.

Finally, Cookie & Cream can be played as a 2-4 player party game. If you've wanted a party game for your PS2, but can't afford to spring for the multiplayer adaptor and two extra controllers, C&C is the game for you. Four players can share two controllers, with each player having half the controller. This will definitely help you get to know your friends better. Remember to unlock the extra characters and levels throughout the regular game, to make them available in the party game.

The only real criticism that I can make of C&C involves the length of gameplay. Although you are encouraged to try to get the best score and time for each level, along with all the hidden secrets, the eight levels stream by awfully fast. The party game mode extends the life of C&C more, but this mode would have benefited from more options when it came to how the levels were set up. We will have to leave that to C&C 2, I suppose.

Multiplayer support

As stated above, Cookie & Cream is really more of a multiplayer game than a single-player one. If you have the friends to play it with, you'll love it; if not, you'll most likely either grow tired of it once you complete it, or be frustrated when you realize that it is too difficult to continue by yourself. If you have to have just one PS2 game when a random group of people comes over, this would be my pick.

Graphics

The graphics in C&C are colorful and crisp, and sport a nice-looking "Saturday morning cartoons" style. Pressing the square button during the game zooms in on your characters and helps you appreciate the amount of work that went into the graphics, but since most of the time it is difficult to play this way, you will probably stay zoomed out. The cinema scenes set up the main bosses well, and despite how strange the main characters are, you can't help but grow attached to them.

Audio

The audio is fitting for the style of the game and, of course, that translates to weird. The music is cutesy but frantic, and the chirpy and unintelligible (is that Japanese dialogue?) comments by the two characters is endearing in its own little way. There is no audio that really stands out, sans the catchy banjo riffs (did I just say that?), but nothing that is really annoying either.

Bottom Line

There really is no other game out there that I can think of like Cookie & Cream. Whether you are looking at it for the challenging single-player mode, the innovative cooperative two-player mode, or the "get to know your guests" party game mode, C&C succeeds. A few more levels and more multiplayer customization would have extended the gameplay even further, but for being the start of something great, C&C deserves an 88.

Snapshots and Media

DS Screenshots

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