Microsoft Flight Simulator for Windows 95

a game by Microsoft
Platform: PC
Editor Rating: 7/10, based on 1 review
User Rating: 5.3/10 - 3 votes
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See also: Simulator Games

Overview

It has been over 10 years since my first flight attempt in Microsoft Flight Simulator II, and I've subsequently used several versions of Microsoft's leading flight simulator on systems ranging from a Commodore 64 to a high-end Pentium PC. While the graphics have definitely improved from that first try, the overall feel of the game has remained the same. Like its predecessors, Flight Simulator for Windows 95 offers a highly realistic experience, from rich scenery to the authentic look and feel of the cockpit and control panels. This new version keeps all the comfortable features which users of previous versions have come to expect, and adds new graphic details and features that enrich the environment.

For experienced Flight Simulator users, this upgrade offers two new aircraft, new cities, more airports, more detailed scenery from around the world, enhanced graphics and new challenges and adventures. For users new to the Flight Simulator family, this version offers a friendlier interface and top-notch flying lessons, making it easier to use than ever before. Flight Simulator allows pilots to test their skills under a variety of conditions from the cockpits of a Cessna 182 RG, Learjet 35A, Schwizer 2-32 Sailplane, Sopwith Camel and two new aircraft -- the Aerobatic Plane Extra 300 and Boeing 737-400. Flight Simulator pilots can execute aerobatic maneuvers just like those in real competitions. The interactive flight lessons teach everything from basic skills -- such as tips for takeoff -- to advanced maneuvers.

Flight Simulator for Windows 95 contains more detailed scenery from throughout the world, including London, Tokyo, New York, Paris, Chicago, Hong Kong, Seattle and San Francisco. The comprehensive online help and new intuitive interface make it easier for pilots to jump right into the cockpit.

Gameplay

Microsoft Flight Simulator is one of the most realistic flying experiences ever created for desktop computers and is designed for dedicated flight fans rather than casual pilots. While it is fairly easy to drop into the cockpit and take off for your first flight, it is not a simple task to bring your plane back safely. It took weeks before I could consistently bring my plane down to a smooth landing on the runway.

The overall interface has been redone in Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and is now easier to use and looks much better than previous versions. The options to select aircraft, location, weather conditions, and other features are more intuitive and more information is provided in the cockpit through pop-up help windows. Once you start flying, users of previous versions will see little difference in the interface as most of the aircraft controls look and act the same as version 5.1.

Flight Simulator does allow for a simplified takeoff procedure and has many helpful aids to keep your plane going where you want it once it's in the air. Serious pilots will want to turn these options off, making the flight more realistic. With full realism enabled, you've got to make sure to complete all pre-flight checks (equipment failures can be set to occur randomly), tune your transponder to the code specified by the tower, set your COM and NAV radios to the local frequencies, check the local weather conditions, wind direction and speed, request permission to take off, taxi to the appointed runway (avoiding any other aircraft), set your flaps, release the brakes and apply the throttle. While this degree of realism may seem excessive to some, it is part of the flying experience and Flight Simulator reproduces it very well.

In Flight Simulator for Windows 95, scenery has been mapped for hundreds of airports around the world, making true cross-country and even global flights possible. Most major landmarks are also included, and it can be very tempting to smash your plane into them. Imagine crashing into Big Ben, the Golden Gate or the Statue of Liberty.

The aerodynamic realism of the flight model is as good as ever -- each plane has its own characteristics and can only be pushed so far. The new Extra 300S had its flight model validated by Patty Wagstaff, three-time U.S. National Aerobatic Champion, and the Boeing 737-400 flight model and avionics were validated by Flight Safety International, world leader in pilot training and full-motion simulation training. Microsoft has even provided a free utility which converts aircraft and adventures created with the popular Flight Shop package so they are compatible with Flight Simulator for Windows 95. You can quickly import any of the hundreds of additional aircraft created by Flight Simulator fans around the world.

The only notable absence from previous versions is support for multiplayer flying, though Microsoft promises this in future releases via its DirectPlay technology.

Graphics

The graphics in Flight Simulator for Windows 95 are an improvement over version 5.1 -- most of the scenery has more detail and the DirectX support allows for faster image processing, giving you smoother animation. Some satellite imagery has been added, but it is not as detailed as that included in other simulations likeFlight Unlimited. While the graphics are better, they are not as good as they could be; adding support for Direct3D in addition to the DirectX support could have made this simulator look even more realistic.

The detail of objects on the ground has seen the most improvement. Most structures look much the same at a distance, but on viewing up close are more detailed than before. There are also more buildings and other structures in the popular areas like Chicago, Seattle, Tokyo and London.

Audio

The digital sound in Flight Simulator has been improved, in particular the landing gear and flaps effects, which now sound more like real aircraft noises instead of power tools. The only problem with the audio in the game is the relative lack of it. There is no audible air traffic chatter; information from the tower comes as text scrolling across the screen, not as audio in the game. The realism of the simulation would be heightened if radio chatter were added; as it is now, you can sometimes feel like there isn't anyone out there.

Documentation

Previous versions of Flight Simulator had huge manuals and large collections of maps. The Windows 95 versi

Overview

It has been over 10 years since my first flight attempt in Microsoft Flight Simulator II, and I've subsequently used several versions of Microsoft's leading flight simulator on systems ranging from a Commodore 64 to a high-end Pentium PC. While the graphics have definitely improved from that first try, the overall feel of the game has remained the same. Like its predecessors, Flight Simulator for Windows 95 offers a highly realistic experience, from rich scenery to the authentic look and feel of the cockpit and control panels. This new version keeps all the comfortable features which users of previous versions have come to expect, and adds new graphic details and features that enrich the environment.

For experienced Flight Simulator users, this upgrade offers two new aircraft, new cities, more airports, more detailed scenery from around the world, enhanced graphics and new challenges and adventures. For users new to the Flight Simulator family, this version offers a friendlier interface and top-notch flying lessons, making it easier to use than ever before. Flight Simulator allows pilots to test their skills under a variety of conditions from the cockpits of a Cessna 182 RG, Learjet 35A, Schwizer 2-32 Sailplane, Sopwith Camel and two new aircraft -- the Aerobatic Plane Extra 300 and Boeing 737-400. Flight Simulator pilots can execute aerobatic maneuvers just like those in real competitions. The interactive flight lessons teach everything from basic skills -- such as tips for takeoff -- to advanced maneuvers.

Flight Simulator for Windows 95 contains more detailed scenery from throughout the world, including London, Tokyo, New York, Paris, Chicago, Hong Kong, Seattle and San Francisco. The comprehensive online help and new intuitive interface make it easier for pilots to jump right into the cockpit.

Gameplay

Microsoft Flight Simulator is one of the most realistic flying experiences ever created for desktop computers and is designed for dedicated flight fans rather than casual pilots. While it is fairly easy to drop into the cockpit and take off for your first flight, it is not a simple task to bring your plane back safely. It took weeks before I could consistently bring my plane down to a smooth landing on the runway.

The overall interface has been redone in Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and is now easier to use and looks much better than previous versions. The options to select aircraft, location, weather conditions, and other features are more intuitive and more information is provided in the cockpit through pop-up help windows. Once you start flying, users of previous versions will see little difference in the interface as most of the aircraft controls look and act the same as version 5.1.

Flight Simulator does allow for a simplified takeoff procedure and has many helpful aids to keep your plane going where you want it once it's in the air. Serious pilots will want to turn these options off, making the flight more realistic. With full realism enabled, you've got to make sure to complete all pre-flight checks (equipment failures can be set to occur randomly), tune your transponder to the code specified by the tower, set your COM and NAV radios to the local frequencies, check the local weather conditions, wind direction and speed, request permission to take off, taxi to the appointed runway (avoiding any other aircraft), set your flaps, release the brakes and apply the throttle. While this degree of realism may seem excessive to some, it is part of the flying experience and Flight Simulator reproduces it very well.

In Flight Simulator for Windows 95, scenery has been mapped for hundreds of airports around the world, making true cross-country and even global flights possible. Most major landmarks are also included, and it can be very tempting to smash your plane into them. Imagine crashing into Big Ben, the Golden Gate or the Statue of Liberty.

The aerodynamic realism of the flight model is as good as ever -- each plane has its own characteristics and can only be pushed so far. The new Extra 300S had its flight model validated by Patty Wagstaff, three-time U.S. National Aerobatic Champion, and the Boeing 737-400 flight model and avionics were validated by Flight Safety International, world leader in pilot training and full-motion simulation training. Microsoft has even provided a free utility which converts aircraft and adventures created with the popular Flight Shop package so they are compatible with Flight Simulator for Windows 95. You can quickly import any of the hundreds of additional aircraft created by Flight Simulator fans around the world.

The only notable absence from previous versions is support for multiplayer flying, though Microsoft promises this in future releases via its DirectPlay technology.

Graphics

The graphics in Flight Simulator for Windows 95 are an improvement over version 5.1 -- most of the scenery has more detail and the DirectX support allows for faster image processing, giving you smoother animation. Some satellite imagery has been added, but it is not as detailed as that included in other simulations like Flight Unlimited. While the graphics are better, they are not as good as they could be; adding support for Direct3D in addition to the DirectX support could have made this simulator look even more realistic.

The detail of objects on the ground has seen the most improvement. Most structures look much the same at a distance, but on viewing up close are more detailed than before. There are also more buildings and other structures in the popular areas like Chicago, Seattle, Tokyo and London.

Audio

The digital sound in Flight Simulator has been improved, in particular the landing gear and flaps effects, which now sound more like real aircraft noises instead of power tools. The only problem with the audio in the game is the relative lack of it. There is no audible air traffic chatter; information from the tower comes as text scrolling across the screen, not as audio in the game. The realism of the simulation would be heightened if radio chatter were added; as it is now, you can sometimes feel like there isn't anyone out there.

Documentation

Previous versions of Flight Simulator had huge manuals and large collections of maps. The Windows 95 versi

Download Microsoft Flight Simulator for Windows 95

PC Download

System requirements:

  • PC compatible
  • Operating systems: Windows 10/Windows 8/Windows 7/2000/Vista/WinXP

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